Blog Archives

Acadia National Park – Bridge Restoration

Acadia National Park - Bridge Restoration

Bar Harbor, Maine

This project comprised the restoration of six historic roadway bridges owned by Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island – Paradise Hill, Fish House Road, Route 233, Sieur de Monts, Kebo Brook and Day Mountain.

These bridges were all originally constructed using solid blocks of granite, all sourced from quarries on MDI.  We worked closely with Freshwater Stone & Brick on the masonry restoration and Sargent Corporation on the bridge deck repairs and traffic control.

Certainly one of the more challenging aspects was striking the right balance on the timing of construction, working around the summer tourist traffic while making sure seasonal temperatures were warm enough maintain quality masonry work

The masonry restoration consisted of epoxy crack repair, joint chipping & repointing, sand blast cleaning and some limited rebuilding.

Architect:  Coplon Associates


Acadia Store

Acadia Store

Bar Harbor, Maine

Each project has its own litany of challenges, and this one was no different.  Taking place on Main Street in Bar Harbor, the original building had to be torn down and a new one constructed, all while not interfering with the very close existing buildings.  The new building virtually covered the existing lot, so there was very little wiggle room on site.

Schedule was also very important, as they kept the existing store open as long as possible in the fall and needed to have the new store operational by late spring.  There was also a permit requirement that a portion of the original front wall/façade remain intact and be incorporated into the new building.  This was all achieved and looks as though it was there all along.

While the building essentially followed the footprint of the odd-shaped lot, it offers a lot of usable space.  It consists of a full basement for storage and assembly of store products, wide open retail space on the first floor, and four apartment units on the second floor that can handle four people each.  

Architect:  Todd Hardy


GSA Tenney Hill Dormitory

GSA Tenney Hill Dormitory

Blue Hill, Maine

This was the second international student dormitory project we completed for George Stevens Academy.  They have a strong contingent of students they bring in from all over the world to attend their high school, so their need for housing continues to grow.

One of the most challenging aspects of this project was the schedule.  The Academy commits to bringing in their students far in advance to the start of the school year, so when we got underway in January there was no other option than to be complete by August for students to move in.

Originally it was a single-family house with an attached garage.  The footprint of the building remained the same, but there were dramatic changes to the interior and significant structural upgrades that needed to be done.

In all it can house 24 students and 2 dorm parents.  It has a central kitchen and dining area, traditional dorm style layout on the 2nd floor, and a recreation room with a ping pong table in the basement.

Architect:  Stanke/Kitagawa Architects


Mason’s Brewing Company

Mason's Brewing Company

Brewer, Maine

What a great transformation this site made from originally being the Town of Brewer’s Public Works location to a new and thriving Brewery and Restaurant.

We worked closely with Chris Morley, the entrepreneur and brew-master, using a design/build approach to turn his dream of owning a brewery and restaurant into a reality.

Due to the previous use of the site, there was a combination of unsuitable and contaminated soils that posed some significant challenges to construction and the budge.  We were able to design a floating slab foundation to minimize the site disruption, reduce costs, and keep the project on track.

The building structure is a pre-engineered metal building from Chief Industries, which provided the necessary clear-span flexibility to create restaurant space in one area and a large brewing operation in another.

Architect:  WBRC Architects


MDI Biological Laboratory – Training Lab

MDI Biological Laboratory - Training Lab

Bar Harbor, Maine

This project was delivered in a hybrid way.  The owner hired multiple entities to perform the work required to complete the training lab and other infrastructure improvements across campus.  The team members had to work closely without having a direct contractual relationship with each other.  Selection of collaborative contractors was important for a successful construction season across the campus.

The project was funded by the State of Maine and the Maine Technology Institute.  Cost projection and best value was discussed at weekly project meetings, along with in depth coordination between the stake holders in the project.

The structure included steel, engineered lumber, and trusses. The exterior received storefront windows and cement board panels/clapboards and PVC trim to withstand the buildings waterfront environment.  The interior includes an elevator surrounded by a stair, kitchen & dining space as well as laboratory casework on the lower level with second floor flex space divided with multiple folding partitions and used for teaching, large presentations, and social gatherings.  One side of the second floor has an exterior open air deck accessible to the flex space and dining area.

Architect:  Design Group Collaborative


In the Woods

In the Woods

Northeast Harbor, Maine

What a tremendous transformation this old cottage went through in one season.  While there were obvious exterior renovations, what really convinced the owners to salvage this cottage was our ability to create an effective site drainage system.  The cottage had always elicited a lot of charm, but that charm was quickly neutralized by the feeling of being in a swamp.  With some extensive site drainage installed, the cottage became far more attractive.

The exterior renovations consisted of a new shingle roof, new EPDM at the balconies, new pre-dipped white cedar wall shingles and refinished trim.

Interior work consisted of patching the existing plaster, all new paint, new electrical service and wiring, and new floor in the kitchen.  The shining star of the interior renovation was the ability to restore the original wood floors, which look stunning.

Designer:  Meredith Randolph


O’Neill Residence

O'Neill Residence

Seal Harbor, Maine

The original buildings on this site were designed and built by Wallace K. Harrison, a world-renowned architect.

The first phase of the project was demolition of two existing buildings, and salvaging siding materials to be reused in the construction of a new garage. The garage was designed to imitate the original building design. Reusing the original board and batten siding required skilled craftsmen to create a fresh look from used materials

The extensive sitework necessary to prepare for the construction of the garage, main house and camp on a lot with shore frontage required special attention to shoreland zoning requirements and federal, state and local building codes. Other challenges were the owner’s wish to maintain existing mature trees, ferns, mosses and other natural life on site.

Phase three of the project was the construction of the main house and the camp. These buildings were completed with a summer break in construction for convenience of the owners.  Interior custom cabinetry including kitchen cupboards and an entertainment center were created in our own woodworking shop.

Architect:  Roc Caivano


Camp Beech Cliff

Camp Beech Cliff

Mount Desert, Maine

This was a fantastic project that was not only a great construction opportunity, it is something that will have a strong community impact for many years to come.

Camp Beech Cliff is primarily a summer day camp for kids, offering programs that range from sailing to pottery to archery.  It sits on a very steep plot of land that extends to the shore of Echo Lake.  During this project the entire campus was rebuilt, which consisted of 20 different buildings.

The Gymnasium and Administration Building each had custom timber trusses.  These trusses were built on site with our own crew using #1 grade Douglas Fir rough sawn timbers and custom steel connection plates.

The site work was one of the biggest challenges.  With three buildings being replaced only a few feet from the waterfront, it was imperative that we maintained a strong erosion control plan and minimized any site disturbance.

Architect:  Rizvi Architects


Parish House

Parish House - Adaptive Reuse of Historic Hall

Bar Harbor, Maine

This project required six apartments inside a historic two story split level building for Community Housing of Maine.  The project was funded with historic tax credits and as such, maintaining the historic fabric was paramount.  However, an eye to project budget was also required.  The topic of cost savings/best value was an always present topic during weekly project meetings, but not at the expense of historic integrity.

The interior of the building was gutted, but most perimeter wall finishes and some interior wall finishes (plaster and wood wainscot) were maintained during construction. Any removed wainscot, trim, and doors from walls no longer needed were salvaged and reused in the new structure where able to.  The building also required structural upgrades from basement to roof trusses.  All carpentry work was performed by our crews from structural repairs to cabinets, doors, and trim.

Multiple methods of insulation was used to accomplish better energy efficiency.  Dense pack cellulose was blown in from the exterior and then hidden by siding replacement in certain bands.  The rubble stone foundation and rim boards received closed cell spray foam.  The attic received blown in cellulose over suspended gypsum ceilings.

Architect:  CWS Architects


Schoodic Woods Campground

Schoodic Woods Campground

Winter Harbor, Maine

What a challenging project to create a large full service campground from scratch.  We worked as a subcontractor to Sargent Corporation, where we were responsible for constructing all 10 buildings.

There were a variety of different structure types and exterior finishes throughout.  The Welcome Center was primarily a log frame structure with SIP panels, custom stone veneer, live edge siding, vertical western red cedar siding, and western red cedar roof shingles.  The interior was exposed log trusses with horizontal pine on the walls.

Most of the service buildings were standard wood framed structures, natural white cedar shingles and clear vertical grain fir trim.  The interiors were primarily tile floors and wainscoting with pine on the upper walls and ceilings.

Architect: Frasier Associates